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Wednesday 01 December 1999

Single- and multiple-dose pharmacokinetics of ziprasidone in healthy young and elderly volunteers.

By: Wilner KD, Tensfeldt TG, Baris B, Smolarek TA, Turncliff RZ, Colburn WA, Hansen RA.

Br J Clin Pharmacol 2000;49 Suppl 1:15S-20S

AIMS: To compare the pharmacokinetics of ziprasidone in healthy young (18-45 years) men and women, and healthy elderly (> or = 65 years) men and women. METHODS: Eight young men, 11 young women, 8 elderly men and 8 elderly women were given oral ziprasidone 40 mg day(-1), in two evenly divided daily doses, for 7 days, followed by a single 20 mg dose on day 8. Serum samples were collected immediately before the morning dose on days 1-8, for up to 12 h after dosing on day 1 and for up to 96 h after dosing on day 8. The resulting data were used to derive pharmacokinetic parameters of ziprasidone in each age and gender group. RESULTS: Steady-state serum concentrations of ziprasidone were achieved within 2-3 days. The steady-state pharmacokinetics of ziprasidone, determined 8 days after the initiation of treatment, were similar in the young men, elderly men and young women. Assessment of gender effects by analysis of variance revealed statistically significant differences in Cmax (85 vs. 69 ng ml(-1) and tmax (3.19 vs. 4.81 h) but no differences in AUC(0,12 h) or lambda(z). Assessment of age effects by analysis of variance revealed statistically significant differences in AUC(0,12 h) (560 vs. 465 ng ml(-1) h), Cmax (85 vs. 69 ng ml(-1) and lambda(z) (0.126 vs. 0.197 l h(-1) but no difference in tmax. Assessment of age and gender effects by analysis of covariance, with body weight as the covariate, did not reveal any significant differences. The mean t(1/2), z in the young men, young women, elderly men and elderly women were 3.1, 4.1, 5.7 and 5.3 h, respectively. Standard deviations of the means for the pharmacokinetic parameters for the elderly women tended to be large. CONCLUSIONS: The influence of age and gender on the pharmacokinetics of ziprasidone is not clinically significant.

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